A revolution without dancing is a revolution not worth having!

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We tend to revisit our prisons. And we always go back.

[…]

I’m in the suburb of my mind. I’m in the farm town of my mind. I’m in the childhood bedroom of my mind. I think every writer stands in the doorway of their prison. Half in, half out. The very act of storytelling is a return to the prison of what torments us and keeps us captive, and writers are repeat offenders. You go through this whole journey with your prison, revisiting it in your mind. Hopefully, you get to a point when you realize there was beauty in your prison, too.

Advice on writing from Sherman Alexie, author of The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven - a fantastic addition to our ongoing archive of advice from acclaimed authors.  (via explore-blog)

(Source: , via iseeitcrimson)

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If the ultimate aim of education in the liberal arts is to draw us out of ourselves, to teach us the language of praise and gratitude, then Jimmie attained it in worship. Education in the liberal arts — if we can still find it in our world — is one important path to finding one’s soul. But it is neither the only nor even the most suitable path for many people. Were we really to absorb this truth, we could stop pretending that the liberal arts are important frosting on the cake of an education that is in fact designed for other purposes. In so doing, we might free the liberal arts to set us free.
Who Needs a Liberal Education? (via ayjay)

(via florilegiumscribblings)

144 notes

memoryslandscape:

[A]nd the world
Whirls green on a string, then
The leaves go quiet, wink
From their own shade, secretly.

Keep still, just a moment, leaves.

There is something I am trying to remember.

Robert Penn Warren, from “2. Deciduous Spring,” in section II “Love: Two Vignettes” of “Delight,” Tale of Time: Poems 1960-1966, in The Collected Poems of Robert Penn Warren, ed. John Burt (Louisiana State University Press, 1998)

(via strathspeyandthistle)